Microsoft Security Essentials Benchmark Tests

September 30, 2009

Just kidding, Microsoft Censorship Department. Crawl back in your holes.

Guess what? The free MSE software that Microsoft has released recently has all kinds of restrictions that prevent you from seeing how it compares to commercial products. Check out this statement in the MSE End User License Agreement (EULA):

You may not… disclose the results of any benchmark tests of the software to any third party without Microsoft’s prior written approval.

Wait… what? This restriction means that nobody can test MSE and compare it to other products and then publish the results. If I downloaded a crapload of viruses to see which ones MSE could detect and posted the results here, I would be violating the EULA and Microsoft could sue me. What the hell?

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Google Chrome OS: Concerns and Answers

July 9, 2009

Google Chrome OSAlright, I thought I was gonna dump this blog out of loss of interest, but after Google announced their own operating system for netbooks, I had to chime in.

The first thing that I want to point out is that now is not the time for people to be freaking out on either side of the spectrum. I’m all for getting excited, but this product is still a year away at least, and until we actually see a release candidate, there’s no way to know what the specific strengths and weaknesses this OS will have.

With that in mind, I’ve been hearing different concerns regarding wether Google Chrome OS will be a viable alternative to Windows 7 or not, and I’d like to respond to each in turn.

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Hash Hacking

March 11, 2009

I found a sweet site for cracking hashes. Not only does it crack most hashes (MD5, LM, and more) in a few seconds, but any hashes that are not cracked right away are kept in a queue where the server continually works on them. Great for MD5 hashes (used by many login systems to store passwords) and LM hashes (used by Windows XP and Vista).

Check it out, and get hacking!


Google and Mozilla: Unfair, Unfair!

February 25, 2009

Apparently Google (along with Mozilla, the folks behind the enormously popular Firefox browser) thinks that Microsoft is being unfair by packaging Internet Explorer with Windows. so much so that they are joining a European antitrust lawsuit against Microsoft.

google-logoNow wait a minute: doesn’t Google “package” its other services within each other? For example, if I do a Google search on “porsche picture,” the very first result is some sample results from Google Image Search. Is this fair? Of course it is. If you wanted a Yahoo! Image Search result, you could have used Yahoo! search in the first place.

So why is it unfair to include Internet Explorer in Windows? Let’s be smart about this. If Internet Explorer wasn’t included, how the hell would people get online to download other browsers? As much as I hate IE, it simply isn’t feasible to ship an OS without a browser. Besides, nothing in Windows prohibits (or even inhibits) the user from using another browser.

Honestly, if anybody should be sued for antitrust, it should be Apple.